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8 paragraphs found in the 1 Book listed below
Economic Sophisms; Bastiat, Frédéric
8 paragraphs found.
S.2, Ch.5, High Prices and Low Prices
II.5.3

Faced with this conflict, the law, it would seem, has only one alternative, and that is to permit price to be arrived at naturally. But then one has to meet the objections of the implacable enemies of laissez faire. They absolutely insist that the law intervene, even without knowing in what direction. Yet it is incumbent upon those who want to use the law for the purpose of creating artificially high or unnaturally low prices to explain the grounds of their preference. The burden of proof rests exclusively upon them. Hence, it follows that free trade is always to be deemed good until the contrary is proved, for free trade consists in allowing prices to be arrived at naturally.

S.2, Ch.6, To Artisans and Laborers
Note:
[ Laissez passer: "allow to pass," substantially equivalent to laissez faire.—TRANSLATOR.]

Second Series, Chapter 10

S.2, Ch.7, A Chinese Tale
Note:
[ Laissez passer: "allow to pass," substantially equivalent to laissez faire.—TRANSLATOR.]

Second Series, Chapter 10

S.2, Ch.8, Post Hoc, Ergo Propter Hoc
Note:
[ Laissez passer: "allow to pass," substantially equivalent to laissez faire.—TRANSLATOR.]

Second Series, Chapter 10

S.2, Ch.9, Robbery by Subsidy
II.9.45

There are those who ask us: "Are you, then, advocating a policy of laissez passer?46* Are you one of the economists of the superannuated school of Smith and Say? Is that why you are opposed to the organization of industry?" Well, gentlemen, organize industry as much as you please. But we, for our part, will take care to see that you do not organize robbery.

Note:
[ Laissez passer: "allow to pass," substantially equivalent to laissez faire.—TRANSLATOR.]

Second Series, Chapter 10

S.2, Ch.10, The Tax Collector
Note:
[ Laissez passer: "allow to pass," substantially equivalent to laissez faire.—TRANSLATOR.]

Second Series, Chapter 10

S.2, Ch.13, Protectionism, or the Three Aldermen
II.13.42

JOHN: I support this proposal by the distinguished previous speaker, who is so humanitarian, and, as he himself said, so completely disinterested. It is high time we put a stop to this brazen laissez passer, which has brought unbridled competition into our market, so that there is not one province whose situation is at all advantageous for the production of any commodity whatsoever that does not flood us with it, undersell us, and destroy Parisian industry. It is the duty of the government to equalize the conditions of production by the imposition of judiciously selected duties, to admit only goods that cost more outside Paris than they do within the city, and in this way to extricate us from an unequal contest. How, for instance, can we be expected to produce milk and butter in Paris in competition with Brittany and Normandy? Just remember, gentlemen, that it costs the Bretons less for their land, their fodder, and their labor. Is it not only common sense to equalize opportunities by a protective town tariff? I demand that the duty on milk and butter be raised to 1000%, and higher if need be. Breakfast may cost the people a little more on that account, but how their wages will go up as well! We shall see barns and dairies rising, creameries multiply, new industries established. It is not that I stand to profit in the least from the adoption of my proposal. I am not a cowherd, nor do I wish to be one. My only desire is to be helpful to the toiling masses. [Cheers and applause.]