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5 paragraphs found in the 1 Book listed below
Socialism: An Economic and Sociological Analysis; Mises, Ludwig von
5 paragraphs found.
Part II,Ch.6
Note:
Godwin, Das Eigentum, Bahrfeld's translation of that part of Political Justice which deals with the problem of property (Leipzig, 1904), pp. 73 ff.
Part II,Ch.7
Note:
Godwin, Das Eigentum, Bahrfeld's translation of that part of Political Justice which deals with the problem of property (Leipzig, 1904), pp. 73 ff.
Part II,Ch.8
II.8.3

Socialist writers depict the socialist community as a land of heart's desire. Fourier's sickly fantasies go farthest in this direction. In Fourier's state of the future all harmful beasts will have disappeared, and in their places will be animals which will assist man in his labours—or even do his work for him. An anti-beaver will see to the fishing; an anti-whale will move sailing ships in a calm; an anti-hippopotamus will tow the river boats. Instead of the lion there will be an anti-lion, a steed of wonderful swiftness, upon whose back the rider will sit as comfortably as in a well-sprung carriage. "It will be a pleasure to live in a world with such servants." *47 Godwin even thought that men might be immortal after property had been abolished. *48 Kautsky tells us that under the socialist society "a new type of man will arise ... a superman ... an exalted man." *49 Trotsky provides even more detailed information: "Man will become incomparably stronger, wiser, finer. His body more harmonious, his movements more rhythmical, his voice more musical ... The human average will rise to the level of an Aristotle, a Goethe, a Marx. Above these other heights new peaks will arise." *50 And writers of this sort of stuff are continually being reprinted and translated into other tongues, and made the subject of exhaustive historical theses!

Note:
Godwin, Das Eigentum, Bahrfeld's translation of that part of Political Justice which deals with the problem of property (Leipzig, 1904), pp. 73 ff.
Part II,Ch.10
II.10.8

A third group of writers content themselves with the reflection that with the spread of civilization and rational living, with the increase of wealth and the desire for a higher standard of life, the growth of population is slackening. But this is to overlook the fact that the birth-rate does not fall because the standard of life is higher but only because of "moral restraint," and that the incentive to the individual to refrain from procreation disappears the moment it is possible to have a family without economic sacrifice because the children are maintained by society. This is fundamentally the same error that entrapped Godwin when he thought that there was "a principle in human society" which kept the population permanently within the limits set by the means of subsistence. Malthus exhibited the nature of this mysterious "principle." *86