Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
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Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
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ACCLAMATION

I.11.1

ACCLAMATION. This term, which signifies a unanimous call, is to be understood in the language of politics to mean that spontaneous expression of general consent which excludes all discussion, and bears down the isolated opposition of individuals. When an assembly votes by acclamation, whether there have been debates on the question at issue or not, it means that an immense majority have agreed on some matter, and that it would be useless to have recourse to the taking of a vote to demonstrate such agreement.

I.11.2

—In Portugal the word has a special signification which is worth calling to mind. It refers to the accession of the house of Braganza to the throne after the overthrow of the Spanish dominion (Dec. 1, 1640). The vote calling the duke of Braganza to power was so unanimous that the word acclamation was perfectly fitted to mark the date when the dynasty of Braganza began. The Portuguese have made it an historic epoch from which they date, and say such an event took place before, during or after the acclamation.

M. B.

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