Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
BIO
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Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
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BUCKTAILS

I.163.1

BUCKTAILS (IN U. S. HISTORY). A part of the insignia of the Tammany society in New York city was a buck's tail worn in the hat instead of a feather; hence "Bucktails" became a common name for the members of the society. The bill which committed the state of New York to Clinton's canal building policy was passed April 15, 1817, and the members most furiously opposed to it were the bucktail members from New York city. The name "Bucktail" then became for some years a common name for the opponents of the canal system throughout the state. Under Martin Van Buren the bucktails gained control of the state, and in 1824 Clinton was summarily ejected from his office of canal commissioner. At the election of 1824 Clinton was chosen governor by a popular majority of over 16,000, and again in 1826. After Clinton's death, in 1828, the bucktails became the democratic party of New York under the lead of the Albany Regency. (See NEW YORK.)

I.163.2

—See 1 Hammond's Political History of New York, from page 450.

A. J.

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