Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
BIO
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Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
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CRAWFORD

I.327.1

CRAWFORD, Wm. Harris, was born in Amherst county, Va., Feb. 24, 1772, and died in Georgia, Sept. 15, 1834. He settled in Georgia in 1783; was a senator from Georgia 1807-13; minister to France 1813-15; secretary of war 1815-16; secretary of the treasury 1816-25; and United States circuit judge for Georgia (northern circuit) 1827-34. In 1817 (see CAUCUS, CONGRESSIONAL) he was Monroe's only real competitor for the presidency; in 1825 he was the regular or "machine" candidate of the elements which had hitherto controlled the democratic party, but the lead was wrested from him by the new elements which, under cover of Jackson's popularity, seized the reins of power 1825-9. The Crawford faction remained intact for a time, but was thrown into utter confusion by a stroke of paralysis which took its leader out of politics. It then gradually united with the Jackson men under the general party name of democrats. (See DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICAN PARTY, IV.) In his time his political influence and reputation were very great; hardly any public man of his time has so completely disappeared from general recollection, or left so little reason for remembrance.

I.327.2

—See J. B. Cobb's Miscellanies, 131-248; 2 Parton's Life of Jackson, 344, and 3:24-70.

A. J.

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