Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
BIO
Display paragraphs in this book containing:
Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
Start PREVIOUS
348 of 1105
NEXT End

DAVIS

I.345.1

DAVIS, Jefferson, was born in Christian county, Ky., June 3, 1808, was graduated at West Point in 1828, was a democratic representative from Mississippi 1845-6, but resigned to become colonel of the 1st Mississippi rifles in 1846. He was United States senator 1847-51 and 1857-61, and was secretary of war under Pierce. (See ADMINISTRATIONS.) He was the most prominent ultra southern leader after Calhoun's death, and was one of the "senatorial group" who, after secession had begun, forced the formation of a new government in the south. (See CONFEDERATE STATES). It is said that the presidency of the confederacy was intended for R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia; but Davis was chosen for it by the provisional congress, was inaugurated Feb. 18, 1861, and was again chosen president by popular vote in the following autumn. Before he was inaugurated the second time, Feb. 22, 1862, he had gradually concentrated almost all the power of the government in the executive. Southern historians generally agree in attributing most of the confederacy's disasters to Davis' perverseness, self-sufficiency and despotic favoritism. He was imprisoned for two years after the war, and then released on bail.

I.345.2

—See Pollard's Life of Davis; Alfriend's Life of Davis; Craven's Prison Life of Davis; Davis' Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government; Schuckers' Life of Chase, 537.

ALEXANDER JOHNSTON.

Start PREVIOUS
348 of 1105
NEXT End

Return to top