Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
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Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
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ANNEXATION

I.62.1

ANNEXATION (IN GENERAL). If this word has any political meaning, it can only be applied to acquisition of territory without armed conflict. Annexation differs, therefore, from conquest, but it is not always agreed to expressly, by the country annexed. In 1845 Texas requested to be annexed to the United States. In 1859 and the following years, certain Italian provinces consented to their annexation to the kingdom of Piedmont. In Germany, after the war of 1866, states were annexed to Prussia without any consultation with their inhabitants, and notwithstanding the minatory tendencies of Germany. The autonomy of these states was extinguished against the will of a part of their inhabitants. The war of 1870-71 seems to have had the effect of hastening assimilation.

I.62.2

—The fate of annexed countries is merged in that of the state of which they form a part. Sometimes they are allowed to retain their legislation and previous structure, (Prussia); at other times, means are taken to hasten their fusion with the state to which they are annexed, into a homogeneous whole, (Italy). Annexations do not seem to raise now, as they once did, questions of a grave international character. We might almost believe that nations had now become less jealous of each other. But in such matters there is no general rule. Each case admits of circumstances and therefore of consequences, and a solution peculiar to itself.

M. BLOCK.

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