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FEATURED ARTICLES

What's Wrong With the Taylor Rule?

Jeffrey Rogers Hummel
November 3, 2014

Believers in economic freedom are generally against government planners micro-managing the economy. But the Federal Reserve Board does, to some extent, micro-manage the economy. That fact tempts many people to advocate for Congress to micro-manage the way the Fed micro-manages the economy. But, tying the Fed's hands with the so-called "Taylor Rule," is a big mistake, says monetary economist Jeffrey Rogers Hummel. Read why.
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Arnold Kling

Public Officials and Cameras

Arnold Kling
November 3, 2014
Should all government officials, not just police, be required to wear cameras as they engage in their duties? What would be the costs and benefits of such a policy? This month, Arnold Kling considers recent calls for cameras on patrol, and considers what might happen were this logic extended even further. Is such a move too great a violation of individual privacy, or just what citizens of a free society need to best monitor the officials who govern them?
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FEATURED COLUMNS

AN ECONOMIST LOOKS AT EUROPE

Pedro Schwartz

The Revival of Nationalism

Pedro Schwartz
November 3, 2014
2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, prompting this month's reflections from Pedro Schwartz. In the resolution to this War, Schwartz finds the seeds of many other problems as well, particularly that of self-determination. This same issue comes to bear on the "velvet divorce" between the Czech Republic and Slovakia, the Catalonians, and the recent Scottish referendum.
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THINKING STRAIGHT

This month, Anthony de Jasay considers the variety of mechanisms by which equality can be satisfied. He notes that justice, which is fundamentally individual, clashes more and more in modern society with collective choice. The latter, he argues, usually carries the day, particularly in the labor market. Yet, paradoxically perhaps, those markets with the greatest quantity of well-intentioned regulation also suffer the highest rates of unemployment.
MORE ARTICLES BY ANTHONY DE JASAY