June 2018 ISSUE

An Unavoidable Theory of the State

By Pierre Lemieux

When the dust settles, Anthony de Jasay's The State1 will probably be recognized as one of the great books of the 20th century. It may be the most serious and subversive challenge to state authority ever written. That this book is not banned must be proof that we are not ...

Does Liberalism Destroy Liberty?

By Arnold Kling

Liberal individualism demands the dismantling of culture; and as culture fades, Leviathan waxes and responsible liberty recedes. —Patrick J. Deneen, Why Liberalism Failed1 (page 88) Patrick Deneen has written a deeply pessimistic book. In short, his ...

A Cure for Our Health Care Ills

By Charles L. Hooper and David R. Henderson

"Nobody knew health care could be so complicated," was Donald Trump's now famous pronouncement on the issue. The Congressional Republicans were struggling too. Not only did they fail to reach a legislative solution, but, even worse, they were confused about where to eve...

The Grocery Store as an Indicator of American Progress

By Steven Horwitz

I have written much about the extraordinary increase in living standards1 that Americans have enjoyed over the last century, and especially in the last forty years. For me, one of the best indicators of this incredible progress can be seen in the evolution o...

May 2018 ISSUE

The Grocery Store as an Indicator of American Prog...

I have written much about the extraordinary increase in living standards1 that Americans have enjoyed over the last century, and especially in the last forty years. For me, one of the best indicators of this incredible progress can be seen in the evolution of the grocery store. A great treatment of this evolution is fo...

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Playing the Game of Life to Avoid Losing

Reality doesn't care about winning arguments; survival is what matters. —Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Skin in the Game: Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life (page 13). 1 In his latest book, Skin in the Game, Nassim Taleb offers an approach to social and political philosophy that he believes will encourage socially constr...

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Does National Security Justify Tariffs?

Economists nearly unanimously support open and free trade among nations.1 The arguments for free trade are not new, dating back at least to Adam Smith's famous book An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations in 1776 and David Hume's series of essays, On Commerce and On the Balance of Trade in 1752. ...

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April 2018 ISSUE

Language and Liberty

Some twenty years ago, I was driving in Belgium and stopped at a petrol station. You must know that I am inordinately proud of my French, so that, though I was in Flanders, a Dutch speaking region, I asked in French for my car to be refilled. Blank stare! I then told the uniformed employee that I was Spanish and did no...

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Economists Should Be More Careful With Their Stati...

In recent years, researchers in the social sciences have realized that they face a "replication crisis."1 As major results in experimental psychology fall apart under further scrutiny,2 economists might have taken comfort in the relative rigor of their own field. However, economists, too, have often been careless in th...

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What Makes Capitalism Tick?

Understanding the market process as a systematic, error-corrective sequence of profit-inspired entrepreneurial discoveries, continually reshuffled and redirected as a result of the ceaseless impact of exogenous changes, should drastically alter our appreciation of key features of capitalism. —Israel M. Kirzner, Comp...

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