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The Failures of the CDC and its Political Bosses

Last Friday, the CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) changed its guidelines concerning the ways the Covid-19 virus spreads; on Monday, one business day later, the government agency changed again and reverted to its previous guidelines (see “CDC Removes Guidelines Saying Coronavirus Can Spread from Tiny Air Particles,” Wall Street Journal, September 21, 2020). Who will believe these politically-tainted public health bureaucrats? Mistrust is justified not only by the catastrophic performance of governments in the Covid-19 crisis, mirroring...
EconLog By David Henderson
10 Percent Less Democracy
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One of the principles I taught my economics students the first day of class and then applied incessantly thereafter was the importance of thinking on the margin. Garett Jones, an economics professor at George Mason University, has written a whole book in which he does...

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Like most every federal bureaucracy in the US, pre-Trump (for better or worse) the CDC was left to languish within it's own ego. CDC (reportedly) had no idea how to track an unknown pathogen successfully so used a UK proposition without thinking - so it is told. CDC had no reason to be concerned about ongoing data nor planning as prior presidents were not. ( H1N1 here ignored or Ebola - well, Not here) CDC decided all deaths with any potential covid-19 association would be so defined.  That was changed recently by the CDC - by word Not by data. To clarify, the US State I live in following CDC, noted 4 deaths from March through May that were not covid.  My email to them suggested that if this year was so exceptional regarding death data during this time, to Please bottle our air and/or water so that no one ever in this state would need to pay any taxes ever more.  It took 24 hours for the data to become accurate. Those who do not stand up for reason, are run over by ignorance. Not sure, just ask the CDC.  

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