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Rachel Laudan on the History of Food and Cuisine

Rachel Laudan, visiting scholar at the University of Texas and author of Cuisine and Empire, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the history of food. Topics covered include the importance of grain, the spread of various styles of cooking, why French cooking has elite status, and the reach of McDonald's. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the appeal of local food and other recent food passions.
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Rachel Laudan on Food Waste
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Historian Rachel Laudan talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about food waste. Laudan argues that there are tradeoffs in preventing food waste--in reduced time for example, or a reduction in food security, and that these tradeoffs need to be measured carefully when considering policy or...

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I worked at a typical McDonald's in 1966. We had whole potatoes delivered, and then cut, blanched and fried them into french fries. I believe they sold for 10 cents a serving. The frozen off-site version did take over, but the suggestion that french fries wouldn't or couldn't have become mass/fast food without freezing is not persuasive.

Temperance….The Polish of Life (Cicero) Prolific New York Times Bestselling author and philosopher Ryan Holiday is amidst a series of books on the four cardinal virtues. He discusses the latest, Discipline is Destiny, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts in this episode. Holiday has written on courage, and he wi...

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  David Henderson

Bottom line: Real interest rates don't reset on bonds you've bought; inflation adjustments reset, even on already purchased bonds, every 6 months. At pickleball a week ago, a number of us got talking about U.S. Treasury I-Bonds. My wife and I have each bought our quota of $10,000 annually for 2021 and 2022. A pickle...

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A Liberty Classic Book Review of Education and the State: A Study in Political Economy, by E.G. West.1 As a society, we have become used to government involvement in education. We rarely subject such involvement to economic scrutiny or ask the historical question of whether its appearance was necessary. E.G. West'...

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  Scott Sumner

There are times when it seems like the entire world is moving toward authoritarian nationalism. Thus it is refreshing to see a right wing party that still seems to have a few libertarian instincts. The Economist has an article on Pierre Poilievre, the new leader of Canada's Conservative Party. In some respects, his vie...

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The growth of productivity—output per unit of input—is the fundamental determinant of the growth of a country’s material standard of living. The most commonly cited measures are output per worker and output per hour—measures of labor productivity. One cannot have sustained growth in output per person—the most...

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Joseph Stiglitz, george akerlof, and michael spence shared the 2001 Nobel Prize “for their analyses of markets with asymmetric information.” The particular market with asymmetric information that Stiglitz analyzed was the insurance market. In 1976, Stiglitz and coauthor Michael Rothschild started from the plausible...

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Introducing No Due Date, our NEW Economics Books Club! No Due Date is our NEW subscription economics book club. Curated by Pete Boettke, you’ll spend a whole year reading with him exploring the best in economics and the social sciences- both classic and contemporary.   Click here to learn more a...

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For decades, Boeing, Bombardier, Airbus, and Embraer—aircraft manufacturers based in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Brazil, respectively—have been involved in protectionist battles that are adjudicated by the World Trade Organization. (The WTO is an international organization with 164 member states, includi...

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  Kevin Corcoran

In a recent article for CNN, Kara Alaimo voices some concerns about speech and social media. Though she makes frequent use of the term “free speech”, what she’s really worried about is unmoderated speech - that is, speech which isn’t restrained by the platform hosting the speaker. To be clear, I believe ...

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