Altruism and Charity, Philosophy and Methodology, Psychology, the Brain, and the Mind, Replication, Reproducing Experiments, P-hacking

Erik Hoel on Effective Altruism, Utilitarianism, and the Repugnant Conclusion

Neuroscientist Erik Hoel talks about why he is not an "effective altruist" with EconTalk host, Russ Roberts. Hoel argues that the utilitarianism that underlies effective altruism--a movement co-founded by Will MacAskill and Peter Singer--is a poison that inevitably leads to repugnant conclusions and thereby weakens the case for the strongest claims made by effective altruists.
EconTalk (Podcasts)
Chris Blattman on Why We Fight
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It's tempting to explain Russia's invasion of Ukraine with Putin's megalomania. Economist Chris Blattman of the University of Chicago talks about his book Why We Fight with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Blattman explains why only a fraction of rivalries ever erupt into violence, the five main reasons adversaries...

Norman Barry states, at one point in his essay, that the patterns of spontaneous order "appear to be a product of some omniscient designing mind" (p. 8). Almost everyone who has tried to explain the central principle of elementary economics has, at one time or another, made some similar statement. In making such statem...

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  David Henderson

Another favorite passage of mine from Atlas Shrugged that doesn’t qualify for the blockbuster category is a statement by Francisco d’Anconia. Jim Taggart, who is about to enter his senior year of college, tells Francisco that the millions of dollars he’s about to inherit are not for his personal pleasure but, rat...

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Since the late 1950s, the regulation of risks to health and safety has taken on ever-greater importance in public policy debates—and actions. In its efforts to protect citizens against hard-to-detect hazards such as industrial chemicals and against obvious hazards in the workplace and elsewhere, Congress has created ...

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By:

  Scott Sumner

The "Yes In My Back Yard" movement in favor of more housing construction recently notched a big win in California. One bill (AB 2011) upzones many commercial areas to allow for construction of multifamily apartments. Another bill (AB 2097) eliminated the requirement that developers provide parking spaces in development...

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William D. Nordhaus was co-winner, along with Paul M. Romer, of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economic Science “for integrating climate change into long-run macroeconomic analysis.” Starting in the 1970s, Nordhaus constructed increasingly comprehensive models of the interaction between the economy and additions of car...

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Capacity of the second strike can impose the peace It may look incongruous to speak of Mutually Assured Destruction—MAD—the sign of nuclear catastrophe, as something reassuring. However, the logic of reassurance is impeccable, or rather it is in a static world. In this world, two adversaries confront...

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  Paul Schwennesen

Adam Smith would smirk.  The latest iteration of old-fashioned mercantilism now links, in a ludicrously appropriate way, the fecal matter of Kansas cows with the green activism of California legislators.  In a “we-shoulda-seen-it-comin’” development, California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard plan is incentivizing...

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Introduction The Reading Lists by Topic pages contain some suggested readings organized by topic, including materials available on Econlib. Brief reviews or descriptions are included for many items. Many of these materials are advanced and are most suitable for post-college students. Topics Microeconomics Pri...

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Is economic mobility a dream of the past? In this episode, host Russ Roberts welcomes Harvard's Raj Chetty, an economist deeply interested in the science of economic opportunity (among other things!). The subject of the conversation is a new study Chetty worked on (and recently published in Nature) which suggests that...

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By:

  Veronique de Rugy

Over at Reason, Christian Britschgi writes about how federal money meant to encourage zoning reform ended up in the hands of those who want to further restrict housing construction. If you want a recap of why land and zoning deregulation is one of the most important policy matters that no one cares about, read Bryan...

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