Supplementary resources by topic. Supply is one of 51 key economics concepts identified by the Council for Economic Education (CEE) for high school classes.

Supply

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Definitions and Basics
In the News and Examples
A Little History: Primary Sources and References
Advanced Resources
Related Topics

Definitions and Basics

Supply, from the Concise Encyclopedia of Economics

The most basic laws in economics are those of supply and demand. Indeed, almost every economic event or phenomenon is the product of the interaction of these two laws. The law of supply states that the quantity of a good supplied (that is, the amount that owners or producers offer for sale) rises as the market price rises, and falls as the price falls. Conversely, the law of demand says that the quantity of a good demanded falls as the price rises, and vice versa. (For reasons unknown, economists do not really have a “law” of supply, though they talk and write as though they did.)…

Economists often talk of supply “curves” and demand “curves.” A demand curve traces the quantity of a good that consumers will buy at various prices. As the price rises, the number of units demanded declines. That is because everyone’s resources are finite; as the price of one good rises, consumers buy less of that and more of other goods that now are relatively cheaper. Similarly, a supply curve traces the quantity of a good that sellers will produce at various prices. As the price falls, so does the number of units supplied….

In the News and Examples

A Little History: Primary Sources and References

Advanced Resources

Related Topics

Producers

Productive Resources

Demand

Markets and Prices

Opportunity Cost

Aggregate Supply